(X) Hide this
    • Login
    • Join
      • Generate New Image
        By clicking 'Register' you accept the terms of use .

Articles

Page  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • ...
  • 186
Next
Items View

  • 10 comments  /  posted by  Emil Stoychev  on  Jun 24, 2008 (more than a year ago)

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.

    I've been playing with some timers and Web Services and I got stuck in a case where the background thread was trying to update the UI. Well, that's never going to happen. To update the UI you should use the UI thread. Let's see how we can call the UI thread from the background thread.

    Consider this situation:

    You have data that needs to be updated every minute. The data is loaded by calling a web service.

    For the update you can use the Timer class. Both the timer and the web service calls are executed asynchronously.



  • 27 comments  /  posted by  Nikolay Raychev  on  Apr 14, 2008 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   grid , layout , nikolay-raychev

    Tweet This!This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.

    Introduction

    The Grid is a layout control used as a container for other Silverlight controls. It acts like a table in HTML but there are many differences in the markup representation.

     

    Overview

    The following example demonstrates how to use a Grid and how to create rows and columns:

    We want to have the following table structure:

    The most important thing about the Grid is how to define its RowDefinitions and ColumnDefinitions collections and how to specify to which row and column every control in the Grid belongs.

    Here is the XAML code:

  • 56 comments  /  posted by  Doug Blackmore  on  Sep 10, 2008 (more than a year ago)
    Tweet This!

    Note: This article is submitted by Doug Blackmore for Silverlight: Write and Win contest.Thanks a lot, Doug! Hello All, Please drop a comment if you like it.

    It is time to vote now! Please, choose your favorite articles and enter your vote by going to contest page. Thank you!

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.

    In this article I will show you how to implement custom ComboBox that includes templating, data binding, and auto complete functionality.

    View the Demo

    Download Source Code

    Getting Started

    The initial code for the combo box was obtained by reflecting (http://www.red-gate.com/products/reflector/) on the Silverlight ListBox control. This provided the initial xaml and C# for the dropdown portion of the combo box, so we renamed the controls from ListBoxItem to ComboBoxItem and ListBox to ComboBox.

  • 104 comments  /  posted by  Brian Noyes  on  Jun 11, 2010 (more than a year ago)

    Tweet This!This article is Part 1 of the series WCF RIA Services.

    Introduction

    In order to build serious business application in Silverlight (and other client technologies), you have to work with a lot of data. And that data is usually not resident on the client machine, it is usually distributed amongst many clients and is stored and operated on by back-end services. If you try to write this kind of application architecture yourself, you have to tackle a lot of technologies and write a lot of plumbing. In the end, most of what you are doing is pushing and pulling data from the client to the back end and invoking operations on the server from the Silverlight client application.

  • 31 comments  /  posted by  Martin Mihaylov  on  Mar 29, 2009 (more than a year ago)

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.


    Introduction

    With Silverlight 3 a lot of new goodies were introduced and one of them was the navigation framework. It allows us to easily implement navigation between the newly introduced Page controls in a Silverlight application, interacts with the Browser History journal and provides us with Uri mapping. To learn more about these features read on the article.

    For this article the demo will be the Mini SilverlightShow application, which I used not a long time ago as a demo to my article about the Telerik's RadPageNavigation control.

  • 23 comments  /  posted by  Emil Stoychev  on  Jun 15, 2008 (more than a year ago)
    Tweet This!

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.


    Introduction

    This articles focuses on the process of creating a Custom Control in Silverlight 2. It describes the basics of what you need to build a styleable control with custom logic that can be used in Silverlight applications. The article shows a sample(part) of implementing a LinkLabel control that recognizes URIs in a given text and displays them as links instead of as plain text.

    Overview

    The control model in Silverlight 2 offers creating UserControls and Custom Controls. UserControls enable encapsulation of a specific logic. They are used in scenarios where you want to reuse XAML and/or logic in multiple places or build a sophisticated page with smaller chunks(the UserControls). However, in other scenarios you may need a custom logic to be built in the control and this control to allow designers customize easily its look. You need a way to modify the control visuals without having to modify the control logic. This is where the Custom Controls comes in handy. In Silverlight they derive from the Control class and specify a default style for the way they will look like.

  • 31 comments  /  posted by  Pencho Popadiyn  on  Aug 19, 2009 (more than a year ago)

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.


    1. Introduction

    With the release of Silverlight 3, a lot of new cool features have been introduced. One of my favorite definitely is the support of behaviors and triggers. In WPF the triggers are extremely powerful. They allow you to declaratively associate an action with an event or property value. In the previous versions of Silverlight one of the things that were really missing were the triggers and the behaviors. It was not possible, for example, to add mouse-overs to objects declaratively (as in WPF).

  • 56 comments  /  posted by  Joel Neubeck  on  Dec 10, 2009 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   webcam , joel-neubeck

    Introduction

    Since the first release of Silverlight, the community has been patiently waiting for a version of Silverlight which would allow us to capture video from a user’s webcam, as well as audio from their microphone. This past month at PDC 09, our wait was over with the release of Silverlight 4 Beta 1.

    In this article we will explore the ways in which Silverlight can interact with a webcam, as well as the powerful results one can produce by combining live video with pixel shaders, video brushes as well as WriteableBitmaps.

  • 30 comments  /  posted by  Martin Mihaylov  on  Apr 14, 2008 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   image , martin-mihaylov

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.

    Introduction

    In this tutorial we will provide brief introduction in the usage of the image control. It’s not very complicated, but there are a few interesting things we can find out about it.

    Overview

    For our examples we will use the turtle from the Sample Images in Windows. Here is the first example:

    <Grid x:Name="Layout" Background="Black" Width="300" Height="200">
        <Image x:Name="MyImage" Source="/Images/GiantSeaTurtle.jpg"></Image>
    </
    Grid>

     

    In it we use the Source property of the Image control.

  • 14 comments  /  posted by  Nikolay Raychev  on  Apr 21, 2008 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   border , layout , nikolay-raychev

    This article is compatible with the latest version of Silverlight.

    As its name says the Border is a Silverlight control that acts as a border. You can put ONE other control in it and it will act as border of the child control.

    See also:
    Silverlight Layout controls
    Canvas Article
    StackPanel Article
    Grid Article

    Overview

    The following examples demonstrate Border’s key properties:

    We want to have the following frame:

    Here is the XAML code:


Page  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • ...
  • 186
Next